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A Wade bridge on a section of Wade Road in Badenoch. Heritage Paths Project
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Scottish Rights of Way and Access Society
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Builg Mounth

Start location: Bridge of Bogendreip (NO 663 910)
End location: Milton of Dellavaird (NO 736 820)
Geographical area: Grampian
Path Type: Rural Path
Path distance: 14km
Accessibility info: Suitable for pedestrians

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Route Description

Just to the east of the Bridge of Bogendreip, take the signposted track leading south parallel to the Water of Dye. After about 400m, transfer to a forest road some 200m higher up the hillside and continue south through the forest for about 3.5km. On leaving the forest the track is quite clear, curving round the base of Hare Hill to join a forest road below Little Kerloch. Leave it at about NO683868 by a path heading south-east along a forest ride towards the Builg Burn. Continue over rough ground to the col between Tipperweir and Kerloch where an old track leads into the forest. This is followed south-east, then west for a short distance, then south-east again along the West Burn of Builg.
From the junction of the East and West Burns of Builg, continue the descent south-east to Corsebauld and Chapelton Farm, from where a farm road going south-west leads to the Stonehaven road, Mains of Glenfarquhar and Auchenblae.

OS Landranger  45 (Stonehaven & Banchory) 

Heritage Information

This is an ancient right of way from Strachan in Feughside to Paldy Fair near Glenfarquhar Lodge, 3km north of Auchenblae.  It was probably used principally as a drove road for drovers heading to Laurencekirk market.  It did not go quite as high as the nearby Cairn a' Mounth road and so would have been snowbound less often.   It was also probably fairly busy with drovers and travellers as the Cairn a' Mounth had a toll at the Bridge of Dye but the Builg Mounth did not.

The Builg is depicted in Garden’s map of 1776  who marks it as ‘Builg Road, a Foot Path' and it is also shown in James Robertson's map of 1822 where it seems to have been upgraded to a vehicular track, although it certainly is not one anymore.

The Heritage Paths project is pleased to announce that Neil Ramsay (our former Project Officer) and Nate Pedersen (one of our earliest volunteers) have teamed up to write an ebook - The Mounth Passes - with photography by long-standing ScotWays member Graham Marr. If you too are interested in the heritage of these old ways through the Grampian Mountains, we highly recommend it.

 

 



Copyright: Graham Marr

Copyright: Graham Marr

 

 

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Copyright: Graham Marr Copyright: Graham Marr Copyright: David Lecore
Copyright: David Lecore Copyright: David Lecore Copyright: Richard Jones
Copyright: ian shiell Copyright: ian shiell Copyright: ian shiell
Copyright: ian shiell

 

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