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Dere Street near Crailinghall.  Taken by Richard Warren. Heritage Paths Project
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Scottish Rights of Way and Access Society
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Path of the Month
General Wade's Military Road, Crieff to Aberfeldy
General Wade's Military Road, Crieff to Aberfeldy

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Tain Drove Roads

Start location: Edderton Mains (NH 720 842)
End location: Milton (NH 766 746)
Geographical area: Ross and Cromarty
Path Type: Drove Road
Path distance: 7km
Accessibility info: Suitable for pedestrians

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Route Description

From Edderton on the A9, 6km north-west of Tain, the minor road signposted to Edderton Mains is followed and continues as a track round the west side of Edderton Hill through the Morangie Forest. At Culpleasant (NH743797) the track divides and the three possible routes to the Scotsburn road are signposted: NE to Rosehill, E to Quebec Bridge and SE to East Lamington.  There is also a western route through Strath Rory to join up with the B9176

For assistance with exploring the area, The Highland Council have produced a Paths Around Morangie Forest leaflet which suggests various trails.

 

Heritage Information

These tracks are a network of old drove roads around Tain. The Lairgs of Tain was a well known drove road used by drovers avoiding the high tolls on the Struie Road. Dalnaclach was a resting point for drovers at one time as well.

The network of roads probably represent a set of tracks that were used at different times. Some of them may have been used in the 18th century when there was a drovers' Tryst at Kildary at the southern end of the paths, some of the paths may have been used to get to Muir of Ord, which became a very big Tryst around 1820 and they were probably all used by drovers avoiding tolls and other big droves.  

 

 

 

 

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Copyright: Steven Brown

 

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